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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a horse since the day he got here. and thanks to carlin's leadership, thanks to marvin pinkert who he calls the genius behind the development of the new space, all of us as citizens can far better experience our history. as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen i value this place deeply. it's ve
has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen, i value this place deeply. it's very, very important. your participation is urged because it's a good thing and for an additional reason, that my vocal chords may fail sometimes but i'm going to go for it, and let's hope i can keep on talking. the two days -- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh is
with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've been in jail. he won the nobel prize and he's still in jail in selma on the right to vote. and the aids simply told dr. king you've got to say you had a purpose. let's say that you're coming out of jail to meet with the president. and that infuriated lyndon johnson because he said nobody in the expense of here in the middle of a controversy. i'm trying to run the country. but on the matter and, he didn't want to say i won't meet with dr. martin luther king partly because he shared the goal of cutting the voting rights bill. so with the work of was kind of an ego where they said dr. king was officially coming up to
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
's a little bit of -- um, lyndon johnson had some nice ones, but lyndon johnson picked up a couple -- lyndon johnson, again, i'm using every authority i can find, but i'm sure he picked this up. pressing the flesh was a johnsonism. i'll be down there pressing the flesh. and ladybird gets credit for motorcade. that doesn't exist before she comes up with motorcade, and it's picked up by "time" magazine. there's no at least written example of that being used before that. um, richard nixon has some nice ones. he -- depending on your point of view -- but silent majority is his, deleted a coinage of his speech writers when they're going over the records of the watergate, their use of term instead of saying censored they used the term expletive deleted which became its own sort of curse word. another one which was very interesting at the time, created quite a stir was when he talked about, started talking about winding down the war and winding down seemed to be sort of -- you know, we're winding up, it was few to american ears and created -- it was new to american ears and created some real respons
to raise in. in the election, president lyndon johnson withdrew from the race, and hubert humphrey was nominated. on election night, george wallace one five states as an independent nominee. here is a resident nixon's swearing in and, about 20 minutes. -- and speech, about 20 minutes. >> do you richard milhouse nixon solemnly swear that you will faithfully exit queue the office -- >> that i will faithfully execute the office >> of president of the united states. >> of president of the united states. >> and will, to the best of my ability, observe protect and defend the constitution of the united states so that you got. >> and will, to the best of my ability, observe protect and defend the constitution of the united states, so help me god. [applause] ♪ >> senator dirksen, mr. chief justice, mr. vice president, president johnson, vice president humphrey, my fellow americans, and my fellow citizens of the world community, i ask you to share with me today the majesty of this moment. in the orderly transfer of power, we celebrate the unity that keeps us free. each moment in history i
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he
of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civil rights icon and not as a non-violent resistence icon or labor rights icon. >> he's so much bigger than the box we tend to put him in. in some of those speeches, in the antiwar speeches he was talking about moving beyond tribe, race, class and nation. that's the kind of radical internationalism that we really don't talk about. even president obama's speech today he's saying we're really loyal not to party but to nations. well, king went far beyond that and say we're not loyal to nations. we're loyal to god.
him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said yeah we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything but
he utilize the power, the threat of power of the presidency the way lyndon johnson did with regard to resolutions during the course of the vietnam war? one senator voting against him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district, call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called, lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number
to purge conservatives in the south from democratic primaries. you could argue lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i do not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word "mandate" should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. the mandate they have been given. that is the great danger. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: there will always be an element of what if with the clinton's second term. we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, tha
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
. bush, lyndon johnson, jimmy carter, and george w. bush. >> by barack hussain obama do solemnly swear -- >> this weekend, president obama begins his second term. sunday the official swearing-in ceremony live before noon. it begins with a look back at the 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 a.m. eastern. monday, the soaring and at noon eastern at the u.s. capitol and other festivities including the capitol lunch and and the parade. all the coverage begins at 7:00 eastern time on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. join the conversation by telephone, facebook, facebook.com/cspan and twitter. >> our web site will have added features including video feeds from the spin cruise, video on demand of the major events -- it c-span crews, video on demand of the major events at c-span.org. president george h. the the bush was inaugurated on to the rate 20, 1989. he was ronald reagan's vice president ford two terms. president bush was one and using the same bible as george washington. this is about 25 minutes. >> i george herbert walker bush is always where -- >> i, george herbert walker bush, do so
, and lyndon b. johnson in six years as majority leader faced one, and harry reid has faced 361 in the same six-year period. and even if you have the 60 votes to end one, they take up the power of the senate. >> stephanie: you know what is interesting. they just did this study -- this is no surprise to you, but the 112th congress was the most polarized ever. the distance between the two due to record levels between the 111th and 112th even different than the before when they used to take out pistols and shoot each over. >> yes. >> stephanie: i look at poll after poll -- i mean 90% of the american people want background checks for gun -- and you think -- and yet you hear over and over we're probably not going to be able to get any of this gun stuff done. but this is part of the reason right? >> it is part of the reason. why are we talking about reducing food stamps and hunger programs at a time when we can't even close a loophole for a oil company. well, it's a filibuster. dream act, why couldn't we do it? filibuster. and we had 59 votes to close debate, and we needed 6
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)